Who Gets The Least Sleep?

June 15, 2020

Who Gets The Least Sleep?

Who Gets The Least Sleep?

As Matthew Walker who is a British Scientist, author of Why We Sleep: Unlocking The Power of Sleep and Dreams, and a professor of neuroscience and psychology at the University of California said, "Insomnia is one of the most pressing and prevalent issues facing modern society today." Sleep disorders are estimated to affect up to 70 million Americans each year. Poor and lack of sleep are linked to memory issues, mood changes, weakened immunity, high blood pressure, heart disease, and more. In this article, we are going to explore who gets the least sleep and steps you can take to dramatically improve your sleep.

Who Gets The Least Sleep?

A research team at Ball State University lead by Jagish Khubhandani, who is a health science professor, analyzed 150,000 working American adults' sleep schedules from 2010 to 2018. They found that nearly 31 percent of all working American adults weren't getting enough sleep in 2010. However, that number has steadily increased to nearly 36 percent over the past 8 years to 10 years. 

Which Demographic Gets The Least Sleep? 

The Ball State University researchers found that African American adults saw the largest increase in sleep deprivation with 45 percent reporting that they don't get enough sleep. Between 45 to 50 percent of people working in the healthcare field (doctors, nurses, etc.) and the military or police force reported being sleep deprived. Furthermore, 41 percent of people in the transport business, which include material moving, truck drivers, and production reported the same thing—sleep deprivation. 

Figure 1 CDC: Age-Adjusted Prevalence of Short Sleep Duration (< 7 hours) Among Adults Aged > 18 years, by State, United States, 2014, CDC

Who Gets The Least Sleep?

Figure 2 CDC: Prevalence of Short Sleep Duration (< 7 hours) for Adults Aged 18 Years and Older, by County, United States, 2014

Figure 2: Prevalence of Short Sleep Duration (< 7 hours) for Adults Aged 18 Years and Older, by County, United States, 2014

Figure 3 CDC: Prevalence of Short Sleep Duration (< 7 hours) For Adults Aged 18 Years and Older, by Congressional District United States, 2014

Prevalence of Short Sleep Duration (< 7 hours) For Adults Aged 18 Years and Older, by Congressional District United States, 2014

Why Are We Getting Less Sleep?

Khubhandani stated, "We see the workplace is changing as Americans work longer hours, and there is greater access and use of technology and electronic devices, which tend to keep people up at night." He continued, "Add to this the progressive escalation in the workplace stress in the US and the rising prevalence of multiple chronic conditions could be related to short sleep duration in working American adults." 

It's Time To Prioritize Sleep (Again) 

As Dr. Shanon Makekau, who is the chief of pulmonary and sleep medicine at Kaiser Permanente in Hawaii told Healthline, "For so long we've talked about being mindful about our health and diet. Sleep is something we take for granted until we don't get enough." 

Some of the most common reasons people report not getting enough sleep include work, social obligations, or staying up on one of their devices. The problem with this Makekau said, "it's harder for the brain to turn off...Let the mind have time to wind down." Rather than checking social media before bed or watching T.V., turn down the lights 30 minutes to an hour before and read a good book or just take your time getting ready for bed. Odds are you'll fall asleep faster, stay asleep longer, and your overall sleep quality will improve as well. 

Who Gets The Least Sleep Review

  • As Matthew Walker who is a British Scientist, author of Why We Sleep: Unlocking The Power of Sleep and Dreams, and a professor of neuroscience and psychology at the University of California said, "Insomnia is one of the most pressing and prevalent issues facing modern society today."
  • Nearly 31 percent of all working American adults weren't getting enough sleep in 2010. However, that number has steadily increased to nearly 36 percent over the past 8 years. 
  • The Ball State University researchers found that African American adults saw the largest increase in sleep deprivation with 45 percent reporting that they don't get enough sleep.
  • Rather than checking social media before bed or watching tv, turn down the lights 30 minutes to an hour before and read a good book or just take your time getting ready for bed. Odds are you'll fall asleep faster, stay asleep longer, and your overall sleep quality will improve as well. 



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